Start National teen dating violence hotline

National teen dating violence hotline

Dating violence is always wrong, and you can get help.

In a 2011 national study of over 15,000 high school students, 9.4% self-reported they had been physically harmed by their partner and 8% of students had been forced to have sex in the previous 12 months Teens frequently communicate with one another through cell phones, email, and social media sites.

Since technology provides quick, constant access to people, it is often used as a tool for abuse and a means to establish power and control that is easier to hide than physical violence and verbal assaults.

(pdf) Teen dating violence can include multiple forms of abuse including unwanted physical contact, sexual abuse, and/or psychological manipulation.

What’s more, while 67% of parents believe they know what is occurring in their children’s intimate/dating relationships, only 51% of teens believed their parents knew “a lot” or “everything” about their relationship.

Dating violence is when one person purposely hurts or scares someone they are dating.

Dating violence happens to people of all races, cultures, incomes, and education levels.

These drugs have no color, taste, or smell, so you would not know if someone put them in your drink.

They also make it hard to remember what happened while you were under their influence.

It is important to create spaces, such as school communities, where the behavioral norms are not tolerant of abuse in dating relationships.

The message must be clear that treating people in abusive ways will not be accepted, and policies must enforce this message to keep students safe.

You may think that behaviors like calling you names or insisting on seeing you all the time are a "normal" part of relationships.