Start Pak chatral xxx

Pak chatral xxx

Tibetan control of the region lasted until late-800s CE.

He introduced polo to the Gilgit region and from Chitral he sent a group of musicians to Delhi to learn Indian music; the Mughal architecture influenced the architecture of the region as well.

Later Anchan in his successors Abdal Khan had great influence though in the popular literature of Baltistan he is still alive as dark figure by the nickname "Mizos" "man-eater".

Gilgit-Baltistan was ruled by many local rulers, amongst whom the Maqpon dynasty of Skardu and the Rajas of Hunza were famous.

However, by 755, due to the An Lushan rebellion, the Tang Chinese forces withdrew and was no longer able to exert influence in Central Asia and in the regions around Gilgit-Baltistan.

By that time, Buddhism was practiced in Baltistan, and Sanskrit was the written language.

In 720, the delegation of Surendrāditya (Chinese: Between 723–728, the Korean Buddhist pilgrim Hyecho passed through this area.

Gilgit-Baltistan is home to five of the "eight-thousanders" and to more than fifty peaks above 7,000 metres (23,000 ft).